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Into the Wardrobe A Community of Wardrobians 2010-08-12T02:45:54+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/feed.php?f=11&t=3602 2010-08-12T02:45:54+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=206316#p206316 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by donand lil — 12 Aug 2010, 02:45


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2010-05-04T05:52:16+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=204772#p204772 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by jayaresee — 04 May 2010, 05:52


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2009-11-03T11:35:10+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=200489#p200489 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]>
"In that way it may possibly be of some help in silencing the view that, if we omit the disputed points, we shall have left only a vague and bloodless H.C.F. The H.C.F. turns out to be something not only positive but pungent; divided from all non-Christian beliefs by a chasm to which the worst divisions inside Christendom are not really comparable at all."

I think that it's fairly clear the Lewis meant Highest Common Factor. I do wonder why he did not expand the abbreviation, and also why he used a mathematical term. I suppose it was in common use as an analogy.

Statistics: Posted by agingjb — 03 Nov 2009, 11:35


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2009-11-03T03:48:29+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=200488#p200488 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by brhoads — 03 Nov 2009, 03:48


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2009-11-03T00:32:05+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=200486#p200486 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]>
brhoads wrote:
Actually, in this context H.C.F. does not mean highest common factor, but Holy Catholic Church. Lewis was talking about the aspects of Christian faith that we all have in common ("catholic" meaning universal, not the specific sect). We know this because of his deliberate use of capitalization.


As a reader of the works of C. S. Lewis for nearly fifty years, and as a Roman Catholic theologian with a canonical mission to teach, one who has taken the oath of fidelity and made the profession of faith, I think I am in a position to concur with Sven and Stanley that "H.C.F." DOES mean "highest common factor."

Statistics: Posted by Paul F. Ford — 03 Nov 2009, 00:32


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2009-11-02T20:44:21+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=200483#p200483 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]>
I admire your ability to create a 'fact' out of thin air.

Statistics: Posted by Sven — 02 Nov 2009, 20:44


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2009-11-02T18:54:12+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=200478#p200478 <![CDATA[Re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by brhoads — 02 Nov 2009, 18:54


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2005-10-25T00:23:51+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=50114#p50114 <![CDATA[re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by Michael Gaul — 25 Oct 2005, 00:23


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2005-10-24T21:55:09+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=50093#p50093 <![CDATA[Re: re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]>
Sven wrote:
H.C.F. means "Highest Common Factor". This isn't the same thing as what we in the States call the "Lowest Common Denominator" when used mathematically, but Lewis isn't using it that way. Lewis is using the term as a figurative expression, the same way most folks in the States would use "Lowest Common Denominator", to indicate the most basic component(s) of Christianity.


And isn't it interesting that, in fact, Lewis' usage is analogously correct whereas the phrase "lowest common denominator" as used figuratively by most people is actually incorrect analogously. Probably because the words "lowest" and "common" in the phrase suggest lower-class or "uneducated" preferences. For instance, if someone describes a movie as appealing to the "lowest common denominator", they generally mean one that ONLY has what may be thought of as "low values" (eg, Porky's or cheap horror or action movies).

But the correct "mathematically" analogous example of a movie that appealed to "the lowest common denominator" for say, a group of people composed of "common", "low", and "high" tastes and morals would have to appeal to all three levels. This is something that Shakespeare was very good at in his plays since they contained a range of qualities (all in a single play, often) from bawdy humour to lofty philosophical investigations (of course, if Shakespeare strove for an even broader expanse of levels than the minimum necessary to cover his audience then it would no longer be the "lowest" common denominator).

Ok, enough math for the day:-)
--Stanley

Statistics: Posted by Stanley Anderson — 24 Oct 2005, 21:55


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2005-10-24T21:16:42+00:00 http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3602&p=50089#p50089 <![CDATA[re: What does H.C.F. stand for?]]> Statistics: Posted by Sven — 24 Oct 2005, 21:16


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