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If made into movies....

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If made into movies....

Postby ransomed » 31 Oct 2007, 22:41

Do you think people would appreciate the ST if it was made into movies since a lot of the science is off? Particularly the science concerned with the planets.
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Postby A#minor » 01 Nov 2007, 00:45

Well, as with any good book that is made into a movie, the producers and writers will twist everything around until the story is barely recognizable and the characters are compromised and the entire moral direction is opposite to that intended by the author. So... I'm sure the film producers will update any scientific facts that Lewis got wrong. :smile:

Why do you ask? Have you heard that someone is making the Space Trilogy into film?
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Postby ransomed » 01 Nov 2007, 01:01

Well, I would like to put it into some visual form myself. Like a graphic novel. I'm going to start it and I realized it will be a total waste of time if Lewis estates/publishers do not want to do anything with it. On the other hand I have a love for the books so, in that sense it won't be a waste of time in the end.

I'm just trying to decide what to do with the whole Mars thing. I'm a stickler for accuracy (not a big fan of the LoTR and Narnia films!). I'm thinking maybe I could just not identify the planets. Thoughts?
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Postby Erekose » 01 Nov 2007, 01:25

I'm sure that others will make mention of copyright issues..

So I'll stick with the bare bones.

Scientific Accuracy is a bug bear for SF writers.

The number of SF stories written by the classic writers of the day which were made "outdated" prior to publication because something new was discovered in the interim is beyond counting.

However, for me, I would find no problem with the idea of a film that depicted Mars in the sense that its described in OTTSP for example.

It's not the accuracy of the science (within the context of whats known at the time of writing) thats the issue.. but the story and the background that count.
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Postby carol » 01 Nov 2007, 10:11

A#minor wrote:Why do you ask? Have you heard that someone is making the Space Trilogy into film?


I know that this is one of the film projects Doug Gresham is interested in. But I don't know whether he has any timeframe for it yet.
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Postby ransomed » 01 Nov 2007, 10:30

Erekose, thanks for your thoughts. I actually feel the same way. I feel that making the planets what Lewis made them would be one of the fun things about putting these in a visual form.
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Postby Sven » 01 Nov 2007, 19:42

ransomed wrote:Well, I would like to put it into some visual form myself. Like a graphic novel.


The Sorn have a brief appearance in at least one graphic novel.

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Postby ransomed » 01 Nov 2007, 20:35

Do you know where that is from and if Lewis was given any acknowledgement for the influence?
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Postby Sven » 01 Nov 2007, 21:08

It's from The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, vol. 2. No, there wasn't any acknowledgment of Lewis, but the League books allude to dozens, maybe hundreds, of other books in their pages. In another part of the book there is a single sentence mentioning a heavily guarded compound containing only an apple tree, with the notation "Narnia".
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Postby Bill » 02 Nov 2007, 12:27

I feel strongly that if a film were to be made it should stick to the original regardless of any "scientific inaccuracies" otherwise why bother?

I have never forgiven the makers of War of the Worlds for updating it and setting it in America for heavens sake. The charm and fascination of the original story is its old fashioned setting and the fact that it was written even before aeroplanes had been invented. Also the fact that it was set in London at the end of the 19th Century.

At least they didn't muck about with the historical setting of The Time Machine but they still took a lot of liberties with the plot.

I realise that this thread is about The Space Trilogy but I feel that what I have said about H G Wells is relevant.

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Postby Erekose » 02 Nov 2007, 20:56

Personally I find the HGWells reference very relevant.

Its a question of "style" over "accuracy".

What counts with stories of CSLewis, HGWells, Jules Verne etc ISN'T wether they are scientifically accurate, but the STORY thats told, and the images they evoke.

"Journey To The Centre of the Earth" is another prime example.

A more modern case in point is the "Lucky Star" series by .. I think it was Paul French. Each novel tended to be set on (or around) one of the planets/asteroid belt..

And the author freely admits to glarring innacuracies in the details of the planets themselves (Mars with canals, Venus covered in water.. etc etc.

But the stories (even though aimed at a slightly younger audience than his normal fare) are still extremeley readable (at least in my view).. and if made properly would make good films.

Where The Space trilogy is concerned, i think the big fear is.. can justice be done to them if transferred to the Big Screen?
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Postby Sven » 02 Nov 2007, 23:10

Paul French was a pen name used by Issac Asimov to write juveniles like the 'Lucky Starr' books.
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Postby Erekose » 02 Nov 2007, 23:56

Yep

I wondered if any one would spot it.

He used the pen name because advances revealled the "error" in his stories before they were published.

He pleaded with (I forget which) editor to print them under a pen name.

I think the editor printed them as "Issac Asimov writing as Paul French"

If memory serves, at the time IA was horrified, but realised that the fans didn't carte about the "inaccuracies", only caring about the story.

Somewheres I have an IA book which recounts the story behind the "Lucky Star" series.

Interestingly, they sort of squeeze into the numerous books comprising the Foundation Trilogy and Robot Series.

/me will NOT venture down the dire paths of film versions of "I, Robot" and "Tricentenial Man"
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Postby Sven » 03 Nov 2007, 12:14

No, he intended to write under the pen name from the beginning. The "Issac Asimov writing as Paul French" was only on the later reprints, not on the originals. (The editor in question was Walt Bradbury of Doubleday.) When he wrote the first one, Space Ranger, the idea was that it would be developed into a TV series, and he didn't want his name associated with TV. After the first one came out, the TV idea was dropped, and he ceased trying to conceal that he was the author. Most of the errors in the stories reflected current (1950s) scientific beliefs, hence Mercury is described as having one face permanently towards the Sun. The other errors, like canals on Mars, were 'willing suspension of belief' in order to provide a background for the stories.
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Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby ransomed » 05 Nov 2007, 11:41

Believe it or not, the above discussion has been a great help!
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