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A Jungian look at the LWW

A Jungian look at the LWW

Postby Stephanie » 30 Nov 2004, 15:46

Hi there, iam currently writng an essay on the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I have been asked to give it a Jungian interpretation! I just love the book, and was wandering if any fellow admirers more intelligent than me could help give me their insight. Thank you.
Stephanie
 

Re: A Jungian look at the LWW

Postby a_hnau » 30 Nov 2004, 20:12

Stephanie wrote:Hi there, iam currently writng an essay on the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I have been asked to give it a Jungian interpretation! I just love the book, and was wandering if any fellow admirers more intelligent than me could help give me their insight. Thank you.


Hmm, there's quite a bit of material on Lewis and Freud, Google will find this easily. Don't know if any of this is relevant to Jung, though. Jung was all about archetypes, no? I guess the obvious place to start would be to see if any of the characters can be interpreted as Jungian archetypes. That's about as far as my knowledge stretches...
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Re: A Jungian look at the LWW

Postby PurplePen » 30 Nov 2004, 21:05

Jung also advanced the idea of the Shadow self -- all that is unconscious to one's...err...conscious self. :) And suggested that unless these unconsciously held beliefs or feelings become conscious (examined and brought out into the light of our understanding), they contribute to an unbalanced, unhealthy relationship with ourselves and others. They can even be seen mirrored in others, that is, the faults we see most glaringly in others may be things we unconsciously fault within ourselves.

And the Myers-Briggs Personality test is a Jungian concept of the personality. People tend to have a dominant aspect in each of three areas: how they relate to the world (extroverted or introverted), how they deal with information (by senses or intuition), and how they process and evaluate that information (by thinking or feeling/valuing).

Anything else helpful that I can remember? Uh...let's see... He also differed from Freud on the idea of religion. Jung thought religion was an expression of a person's inner desire to balance one's consciousness with the collective unconsciousness (those archetypes that a_hnau pointed out).

I think that's all of my accessible knowledge on the subject. The rest is buried in my unconscious self. Have fun!

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Re: A Jungian look at the LWW

Postby postodave (it really is) » 10 Dec 2004, 14:18

This is slightly tangential but I think it might help. Ursula Le Guin did a to my mind very convincing Jungian interpretation of Lord of the Rings. You will find it in a collection by her called 'The Language of the Night' But it is scattered through several essays not just in the one specifically about LTR. You will find Jungian interpretations of Hans Anderson, various traditional failry tales and her own work which is full of Jungian symbolism in other essays. It's some of the best criticism of fantasy I've ever read and it might spark some thinking

I also seem to remember a Jungian analysis of fairy tales in 'Man and his Symbols' by Jung and others. Lewis himself was fairly dismissive of Jung's approach to myth and fairy tale saying that all he done was to create yet another myth.
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