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quote about Narnia

quote about Narnia

Postby Lucy » 25 Jul 2007, 13:46

If someone is willing and able to help me on this, I will appreciate it. I'm doing a research report about C. S. Lewis, and I'm looking for some help. I realize that you don't want to do anyone else's homework for them, but if someone can help me find the truth about this quote, I will appreciate it. In my report, I want to talk some about Narnia and what Lewis said about how it came to be. In a catalouge which sold Narnian books, knick-knacks, etc., I found this quote: "The whole Narnian story is about Christ," Lewis once wrote. "That is to say, I asked myself, suppposing that there really was a world like Narnia, and supposing it had(like our world) gone wrong, and supposing Christ wanted to go into that world and save it ( as He did ours), what might have happened?" However, in all the books I have read thus far, I have read nothing about this. They all say that the story of Narnia began with a picture of a faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood. I really like this quote, though; and if someone can point me to a book, essay, interview, etc. in which Lewis says this or at least tell me if this is a true quote, that will be helpful. Thank you very much.
Lucy
 

Postby loeee » 25 Jul 2007, 16:09

Lucy, I'm not going to be much help (I'm sure there are people in here who will give you a source for your quote) but I did want to point out that being about Christ, and beginning from a mental picture of a faun with an umbrella are not mutually exclusive. They may both be quite true.
"You can't go walking through Mordor in naught but your skin."
Put on the full armor of God.
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Postby Stanley Anderson » 25 Jul 2007, 18:00

Look to this thread:

http://cslewis.drzeus.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=56120&sid=93e3f8d5cb1f16b0561970066f615c80

See particularly Paul Ford's reply, third post down in the thread.

--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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Postby Lucy » 26 Jul 2007, 15:55

Thank you. That answers my question very well.
I'm glad to be able to say that Lewis's work is definitely
a good story with deep Christian truths in it and that Lewis
himself planned this. This has helped me very much.
Thanks a lot. :pleased:
Lucy
 

Postby moordarjeeling » 27 Jul 2007, 00:12

Lucy wrote:I'm glad to be able to say that Lewis's work is definitely
a good story with deep Christian truths in it and that Lewis
himself planned this.


If I go looking for the other thread I'll lose this one. :-) But sources for direct quotes would include OF OTHER WORLDS and PAST WATCHFUL DRAGONS and Lewis' LETTERS TO CHILDREN.

Basically as Lewis says "It began with a picture" or rather several pictures that had been collecting in Lewis' imagination for years, and the faun with an umbrella was one of them. Then not long before writing the books he was having nightmares about a giant lion. Then the lion and the pictures all sort of got into the same story-kettle.

Lewis talked about 'the artist' who wanted to write an interesting story and 'the man' who didn't want to spend time on just any story, however artistically interesting; then when he considered the Christian angle, 'the [Christian] man' could justify spending time on the project. And that angle or theme was planned as a way of getting past the 'watchful dragons' in the mind, a 'baptism of the imagination' of the children who would read it. (Definitely what his critics would call a Christian agenda!)
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