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Perelandra Chap. 8

An archived study of the second book of Lewis' theological science fiction Space Trilogy.

Re: Perelandra Chap. 8 -- Stanley's comments

Postby Steve » 15 Jan 2005, 13:29

I think it is, as has been suggested by -- ?? was it Steve or K?

Neither, I think it was more than just suggested by the author himself. From the last paragraph of the chapter:
At the same moment he was conscious of a sense of triumph. But it was not he who was triumphant. The whole darkness around him rang with victory. ... From without, most certainly from without, but not by the sense of hearing, festal revelry and dance and splendour poured into him -- no sound, yet in such a fashion that it could not be remembered or thought of except as music."
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Re: Perelandra Chap. 8 -- Stanley's comments

Postby Stanley Anderson » 15 Jan 2005, 16:11

Steve wrote:
I think it is, as has been suggested by -- ?? was it Steve or K?

Neither, I think it was more than just suggested by the author himself. From the last paragraph of the chapter:
At the same moment he was conscious of a sense of triumph. But it was not he who was triumphant. The whole darkness around him rang with victory. ... From without, most certainly from without, but not by the sense of hearing, festal revelry and dance and splendour poured into him -- no sound, yet in such a fashion that it could not be remembered or thought of except as music."


Unfortunately, you are a victim of my tortuously long and convoluted sentences where my primary intention is not as clear as it should be. Thus, here is what I wrote:

I think it is, as has been suggested by -- ?? was it Steve or K? – that a sort of cosmic rejoicing and victory was enacted in the Green Lady’s declaration and praise of Maleldil about the idea of serving rather than ruling over her own children and the beauty and wonder that they might surpass her and that she rejoices in that fact.


Out of that morass of ideas in that sentence, the particular thing I was suggesting that you or K had suggested was NOT the victory ringing itself per se, or even the refusal to be tempted per se, but that the ringing was caused by the Lady's affirmation of the fundamental holy dictum about serving, even taking joy at the idea that her offspring would be greater than she and that she would serve them.

And just for the record, as I look back at the posts I see these two sections:

[from Steve]:
What impressed me in the chapter is how Ransom sensed all of Perelandra rejoicing in the Lady's refusal to be tempted.


[from K]:
His "familiar" must have been exasperated at the Green Lady's unselfishness.


So, in fact it was K that made the suggestion I was heading for, not just the Lady's refusal to be tempted, as you suggested (not that I think you wouldn't see the other part too, just that your post didn't mention it in particular)

--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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