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Chapter Seven

A study of a book by GK Chesterton.

Chapter Seven

Postby The Bigsleep J » 30 Mar 2006, 18:16

In this chapter Gogol is unmasked and turns out not to be a Pole at all, but a Cockney impersonating one To everyone’s surprise (and the relief of the policeman) Sunday lets him go, however threatening him with unspeakable torment should he continue. Gogol leaves the scene, possibly while taking a nasty tumble down the stairs.

Syme goes outside for ‘fresh air’ and goes to a restaurant to formulate a game-plan (mostly to decide if he still has to keep his promise to Gregory). It was there that he saw the Professor drinking milk in the same restaurant. He had seen him on the street not a while back and it struck him that the strange professor might be following him. He and the professor chase each in the area in and around St Paul’s Cathedral before Syme heads towards a pub near the river. Only moments later the Professor enters and orders milk.


***************

This is a fairly straightforward chapter. It does however establish the fact that Syme did not go undetected, possibly, by the suspicions of Sunday, who might have sent the Professor to follow him. This adds a level of tension which turns nightmarish once Syme is unable to shake the de Worms who seems to be able to keep up despite being lame.

In the chapter Syme is however, like the chapter before, encouraged by some external symbol, just like the barrel-organ in the chapter before. This time however it is the ornament on top of St. Pauls which would eventually become the subject of another book by Chesterton, the Ball and the Cross. After Syme looks at it, he practically dares Professor de Worms to catch him.

There is a slightly surreal feel to this novel which seems to suggest time passing faster than normal. Only a short while ago Syme was having a large breakfast with the conspirators and they end the meeting to go get lunch (it was past noon already). Soon the sun has set. This only adds to the dream-like atmosphere to the

Also, at the beginning, it displays Sundays odd inability to give a straight answer. Martin Gardner gave an interesting suggestion as to why, but I’ll get to that in a few months when we do chapter 13, The Persuit of the President.
Insert supposedly witty but random absurd comment here and add water
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Re: Chapter Seven

Postby Sven » 30 Mar 2006, 22:11

The Bigsleep J wrote:There is a slightly surreal feel to this novel which seems to suggest time passing faster than normal. Only a short while ago Syme was having a large breakfast with the conspirators and they end the meeting to go get lunch (it was past noon already). Soon the sun has set. This only adds to the dream-like atmosphere...


ah, not dream like, but nightmarish :) Not only does the time past quickly, but it does strange things. In chapter 5, as Syme walks through Leicester Square on the way to the breakfast a mention is made of 'sunlit leaves', yet, when he leaves that same breakfast, it begins to snow. Earlier in the book it was mentioned that it was February (when Syme boarded the tug), which the snow goes with, but 'sunlit leaves' on the trees?
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Re: Chapter Seven

Postby The Bigsleep J » 31 Mar 2006, 06:22

Sven wrote:ah, not dream like, but nightmarish :) Not only does the time past quickly, but it does strange things. In chapter 5, as Syme walks through Leicester Square on the way to the breakfast a mention is made of 'sunlit leaves', yet, when he leaves that same breakfast, it begins to snow. Earlier in the book it was mentioned that it was February (when Syme boarded the tug), which the snow goes with, but 'sunlit leaves' on the trees?


Good point! I forgot about the trees. And lets not forget that a few chapters later, in France, they're fighting in a field of flowers which I doubt would bloom in February.
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Worming his way around

Postby Kanakaberaka » 14 Apr 2006, 21:40

I was at first confused about how Professor de Worms managed to get around as quickly as he did. Since Syme only noticed him as the Professor caught up with him I at first thought that is was some sort of teleportation or astral projection. The sort of trick that Wither pulled in That Hideous Strength. And yet when Syme discovers the secret of the Professor's rapid locomotion near the end of this chapter, I was no less amazed. Relived that there was a physical explanation for how he kept up with Syme. But in wonder of what the Professor really was. Between the unmasking of Gogol as a Cockney and the bizarre sightings of Professor de Worms, I am sure this would make a fine action adventure film.
so it goes...
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