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Ch 4a: pp 45-49

For the Medieval Dinosaur in all of us.

Ch 4a: pp 45-49

Postby Stanley Anderson » 06 Jun 2007, 16:17

(All of the chapter’s introduction up to, but NOT including section A [“Chalcidius”] -- Seven paragraphs beginning with "All the texts..." and ending with "...belong to us Christians.")

Lewis talks here about not the differences, but the similarities of the two “religious” sides battling for dominance in the pre- or formative medieval years, saying even that it is often difficult to tell if a writer from that period was Christian or pagan. I think of the problems some people have with the “pagan gods” scene in Prince Caspian. The last sentence of the TDI section, “Whatever things have been well said by all men belong to us Christians” might also apply to imagery and myth, and Lewis uses them extensively in Narnia.

We also see an explicit demonstration and “explanation” of this “gathering up” of mythic elements into the Christian fold in the Space Trilogy when Ransom contemplates in OSP and Perelandra that various “mythological” images on earth appear in reality on the other worlds (eg the cyclopean cave-dwelling shepherd nature of the sorns, and the heraldic dragon creature in Perelandra). He also offers an “explanation” from the opposite direction (ie from Earth’s point of view) wherein the Oyarsa of other worlds have their “Earthly manifestations” in the Greek and Roman myths of the gods

Again, as I've mentioned in this study's introduction and periodically in the sections, this strikes me as a very “fractal” or medieval aspect (I’ve come to the conclusion that fractal-ness is a very medieval-friendly concept:-) of the books where larger images and themes are reflected in smaller ones and visa versa throughout the books.

--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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Postby liriodendron » 09 Jun 2007, 04:23

I always thought the concept of Greek gods being a reflection of angels was an interesting one. In Revelation 16: 5 is a reference to an 'angel in charge of the waters': "Then I heard the angel in charge of the waters say: "You are just in these judgments, you who are and who were, the Holy One, because you have so judged;" What if the Greeks recognized the power in charge of water, but mis-interpreted it as Poseidon? In this case it would be a mis-understanding, not an earthly reflection of celestial angels. Lewis' angels are bigger and his layers of creatures richer.
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Re: -

Postby Stanley Anderson » 28 Jun 2007, 14:03

liriodendron wrote:Lewis' angels are bigger and his layers of creatures richer.


At first I thought your sentence said "...and his lawyers of creatures richer." So their fees are extravagant there too, eh? (though I understand Jesus, unlike these above, worked pro bono for us:-)

--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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