This forum was closed on October 1st, 2010. However, the archives are open to the public and filled with vast amounts of good reading and information for you to enjoy. If you wish to meet some Wardrobians, please visit the Into the Wardrobe Facebook group.

For those that have read Chesterton's Orthodoxy....

Plato to MacDonald to Chesterton, Tolkien and the Boys in the Pub.

For those that have read Chesterton's Orthodoxy....

Postby Adastra » 22 Dec 2007, 19:41

Okay....I really want to like this book, but I'm just having a hard time following it. I'm finding myself having to re-read some parts of it, but yet still not completely understanding why Chesterton makes some of the statements that he does. ... And I know the problem is not the author, it's me not comprehending well enough.
Does anyone know of some sort of study guide material for this book or something to help me better understand where Chesterton is coming from and what he means with some of his statements?
Adastra
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2007

Postby postodave » 29 Mar 2008, 00:38

Well the expert on all things Chestertonian on this site is Rusmeister. He drives me mad with it but send him a private message and see if he will clue you in.
So I drew my sword and got ready
But the lamb ran away with the crown
postodave
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 816
Joined: Oct 2004

Postby rusmeister » 30 Mar 2008, 16:39

Wow! I consider myself complemented! Thank you! :smile:

"He's mad! Mad, I tell you!"
"It is not I who am crazy! It is I who am MAD!!!" (Ren + Stimpy) :wink:

Seriously, I would say that Chesterton is a harder read than Lewis - he's harder to follow initially, until you get his drift. When you do, look out!

In his biography (by Maisie Ward), relatives reported that doctors predicted that this kid with his huge head would be either a genius or an idiot.

An idiot doesn't get reprinted for a hundred years running.

I'd say that there are excellent answers at the website of the American Chesterton website http://www.chesterton.org/ . People like Dale Alquist know more. But I’d be happy to do my best to answer any questions here (the OP is an old post that I missed).
"Eh? Two views? There are a dozen views about everything until you know the answer. Then there's never more than one."
Bill "The Blizzard" Hingest - That Hideous Strength
User avatar
rusmeister
 
Posts: 1778
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Russia

Postby ABC » 23 Apr 2008, 14:19

Have you read Chesterton's "Heretics"? I found it much easier to understand what Chesterton was arguing FOR in "Orthodoxy" once I understood what he had been arguing AGAINST in "Heretics".
ABC
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Jul 2006

Postby repectabiggle » 23 Apr 2008, 14:50

I just recently read Heretics. Great fun. I think that's one of the things some people may find difficult in Chesterton: he's fun! Seriously, Chesterton is all about unmitigated jollity in refuting nonsense and substantiating truth. And he loves paradox. Oh wow, does that man love paradox, but that can probably be tough to get used to for some readers in our time.

I need to read Orthodoxy. Unfortunately, although Heretics is available online at Google Books, Orthodoxy isn't, which I assume means the one is still copyrighted and the other isn't? Go figure.[/i]
User avatar
repectabiggle
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 277
Joined: Sep 2007

Postby rusmeister » 23 Apr 2008, 16:47

repectabiggle wrote:I just recently read Heretics. Great fun. I think that's one of the things some people may find difficult in Chesterton: he's fun! Seriously, Chesterton is all about unmitigated jollity in refuting nonsense and substantiating truth. And he loves paradox. Oh wow, does that man love paradox, but that can probably be tough to get used to for some readers in our time.

I need to read Orthodoxy. Unfortunately, although Heretics is available online at Google Books, Orthodoxy isn't, which I assume means the one is still copyrighted and the other isn't? Go figure.[/i]


All of his stuff is now in the public domain.
Try these excellent sites:
A great many of his works online, including Orthodoxy:
http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~mward/gkc/index.html

A mega-links site:
http://socrates58.blogspot.com/2006/04/ ... links.html

Of course, Dale Alquist's user-friendly site:
http://www.chesterton.org/
"Eh? Two views? There are a dozen views about everything until you know the answer. Then there's never more than one."
Bill "The Blizzard" Hingest - That Hideous Strength
User avatar
rusmeister
 
Posts: 1778
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Russia

Postby repectabiggle » 23 Apr 2008, 17:06

Excellent. Thanks, rusmeister!
User avatar
repectabiggle
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 277
Joined: Sep 2007

Postby Sarah N. » 17 May 2008, 05:55

I believe the American Chesterton Society, or someone like them, has published an annotated version of Orthodoxy. I don't know if that would help much, or if they would just dive off into lengthy explanations of what Hanwell is. :toothy-grin:
Live in the world as if only God and your soul were in it; then your heart will never be made captive by any earthly thing. ~ St. John of the Cross

Member of the 2456317 Club.
User avatar
Sarah N.
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 1411
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Maple Lake, MN

Postby Sven » 17 May 2008, 11:48

The ISBN is 0970377215.


Image
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
User avatar
Sven
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 2873
Joined: Aug 1996
Location: Greenbelt, MD, near Washington DC

Postby rusmeister » 18 May 2008, 01:49

Another thing that strikes me more and more (rather than less and less) about GKC is his joy and lack of bitterness - if not for the Marconi history, which did heavily impact him, he would have had a pretty cloudless life. I wish I could be so gentlemanly to people I disagree with and be so cheerful.
"Eh? Two views? There are a dozen views about everything until you know the answer. Then there's never more than one."
Bill "The Blizzard" Hingest - That Hideous Strength
User avatar
rusmeister
 
Posts: 1778
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Russia

Postby reveal » 04 Jun 2008, 06:22

I just started reading Orthodoxy, and I really like it so far :smile: . For some reason it reminds me of Kierkegaard a bit, not sure why..
reveal
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Jul 2007

Postby Cet » 24 Jun 2008, 16:15

rusmeister wrote:
repectabiggle wrote:I just recently read Heretics. Great fun. I think that's one of the things some people may find difficult in Chesterton: he's fun! Seriously, Chesterton is all about unmitigated jollity in refuting nonsense and substantiating truth. And he loves paradox. Oh wow, does that man love paradox, but that can probably be tough to get used to for some readers in our time.

I need to read Orthodoxy. Unfortunately, although Heretics is available online at Google Books, Orthodoxy isn't, which I assume means the one is still copyrighted and the other isn't? Go figure.[/i]


All of his stuff is now in the public domain.
Try these excellent sites:
A great many of his works online, including Orthodoxy:
http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~mward/gkc/index.html

A mega-links site:
http://socrates58.blogspot.com/2006/04/ ... links.html

Of course, Dale Alquist's user-friendly site:
http://www.chesterton.org/


...Rusmeister, don't take this the wrong way but...I love you. :stunned:
Cet
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Jun 2008

Postby blindlemonpie » 25 Jun 2008, 04:37

I finished Orthodoxy today, and I thought it was wonderful. One of Chesterton's most commendable attributes is his ability to explain the symbolism and subtle nuances of history and everyday life as a skilled commentator might a work of literature. Afterall, he is offering us a chance to participate in that awful (in the old sense) that is lies at the center of poetry and romance.

Has anyone read his book on St. Francis? I read it a few years ago, and it was my first sojourn in the world of Chesterton. Perhaps it was because I had recently read Omer Englebert's wonderful St. Francis: A Biography, but I don't remember being greatly impressed. The one image that remains burned into my mind is of Francis teaching Christian Europe to rejoice after having endured the Middle ages as a penance for paganism (I wish I could dig up the quote. Maybe later). As Chesterton never intended this essay to stand in place of a detailed biography, I should read it again now that Englebert is not as fresh in my mind. Perhaps I'll gain more from it at the ripe old age of 22. :toothy-grin:
User avatar
blindlemonpie
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Georgia, The United State of

Postby Wixenstyx » 08 Oct 2008, 19:51

The only Chesterton I've read so far is 'The Man Who Was Thursday', which was recommended to me by a friend. After reading this thread, I think it's definitely time to raid my local library and see what I can find.

Where is the best place to start, in your opinion? Orthodoxy?
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
And one of the elders saith unto me, "Weep not:
Behold, the Lion of the tribe of Judah hath prevailed..."
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Member of the 2456317 Club
User avatar
Wixenstyx
Wardrobian
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: St. Louis, MO (The Holy City)

Postby rusmeister » 09 Oct 2008, 05:19

Wixenstyx wrote:The only Chesterton I've read so far is 'The Man Who Was Thursday', which was recommended to me by a friend. After reading this thread, I think it's definitely time to raid my local library and see what I can find.

Where is the best place to start, in your opinion? Orthodoxy?

Orthodoxy is the best, I think, if you have to choose one. Although his true masterpiece is "The Everlasting Man". His whimsical stories (Manalive, The Flying Inn, The Ball and the Cross, etc) contain oodles of truth, but his real strength is in his essay - so Orthodoxy, TEM, Heretics and "What's Wrong With the World" are tops, imo. For a man who wrote roughly 70 books that are all great, it's hard to choose.

My own experience was that reading the first few books was difficult and slow - but it turned out to be a matter of my "getting his drift". Once I did, the reading began to fly!

He's a deadly enemy of modern thought - even more so than Lewis. Lewis was the greater logician, and so attracts the mind, but Chesterton strikes the heart.
"Eh? Two views? There are a dozen views about everything until you know the answer. Then there's never more than one."
Bill "The Blizzard" Hingest - That Hideous Strength
User avatar
rusmeister
 
Posts: 1778
Joined: Dec 2005
Location: Russia

Next

Return to Inklings & Influences

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered members and 1 guest