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Lewis library comparisons

The man. The myth.

Lewis library comparisons

Postby Adam Linton » 16 Aug 2008, 22:34

OK. I admit that when it comes to my books I can be a bit...materialistic. (I hope that this doesn't get me in trouble.) But I'm slowly working on cataloging my library. Was looking over my Lewis section--and thought that I'd share it with the Warbrobe folks. If you have one that I don't have (yet), please let me know...

These are only works by Lewis (including posthumous).

By the way, I've never (almost never) spent money on fancy editions, first editions and such. Many of these are paperback.

Here goes:

The Abolition of Man
The Allegory of Love
Christian Reflections
The Collected Letters, Vol. I
The Collected Letters, Vol. II
The Collected Letters, Vol. III.
[The Chronicles of Narnia:]
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
Prince Caspian
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Silver Chair
The Horse and His Boy
The Magician’s Nephew
The Last Battle

The Dark Tower and Other Stories
The Discarded Image
An Experiment in Criticism
The Four Loves
George MacDonald
God in the Dock: Essays on Theology and Ethics
The Great Divorce
A Grief Observed
Letters of C. S. Lewis
Letters to an American Lady
Letters to Children
Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer
Mere Christianity
Miracles
Narrative Poems
On Stories and Other Essays on Literature
Poems
Poetry and Prose in the Sixteenth Century
The Pilgrim’s Regress
A Preface to Paradise Lost
Present Concerns
The Problem of Pain
Reflections on the Psalms
The Screwtape Letters
Selected Literary Essays
[Space Trilogy:]
Out of the Silent Planet
Perelandra
That Hideous Strength

Spenser’s Images of Life
Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Studies in Words
Surprised by Joy
Till We Have Faces
The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses
The World’s Last Night and Other Essays
Last edited by Adam Linton on 18 Aug 2008, 15:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Sven » 16 Aug 2008, 23:49

I have everything you have, minus Spenser’s Images of Life. Instead of Poetry and Prose in the Sixteenth Century I have the same book under the original title English Literature of the Sixteenth Century, Excluding Drama. I also have They Stood Together (Lewis' letters to Arthur Greaves), the Chronicles of Narnia in both the US and UK versions, both collections titled Poems (the 1994 edition adds the 'epic' Spirits in Bondage plus 17 previously uncollected poems to the contents of the 1964 edition), The Tortured Planet (Lewis' own abridgment of That Hideous Strength), Voyage to Venus (identical to Perelandra except for the title), and The Lefay Fragment inside of Hooper's Past Watchful Dragons. I think the only first edition I have is The Great Divorce. I have multiple copies of some, notably The Screwtape Letters, including the unabridged audio book read by John Cleese and the graphic novel.


But, I'm not obsessed, or anything...Really... :tongue:
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby Karen » 17 Aug 2008, 00:28

I collect first or early (if I can't afford the true firsts) printings, mostly American, of Lewis that I've enjoyed reading. I have:

The Screwtape Letters, NY, 1943. First edition, 8th printing.

The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses, NY, 1949. First edition.

Surprised By Joy, NY, 1955, First edition, 10th printing.

Till We Have Faces, NY, 1957. First edition.

Reflections on the Psalms, NY, 1958. First edition.

The Four Loves, NY, 1960. First edition.

Letters to Malcolm, London, 1964. First edition.

Letters to an American Lady, Grand Rapids, 1967. First edition.

God in the Dock, NY, 1970. First edition.

I would love to be able to afford Mere Christianity, but the British first is going for over $1,000 these days, and the American for about $400. So I have it in paperback, along with:

The Abolition of Man
Christian Reflections
The Problem of Pain
Miracles
The Great Divorce
A Grief Observed
I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library. -- Jorge Luis Borges
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Postby john » 17 Aug 2008, 00:38

I've actually given away or sold quite a few of my Lewis books, mostly due to moving overseas and back.

I've kept 3 editions of the Chronicles of Narnia, a first American edition of Till We Have Faces, Letters to Children, and Screwtape Letters. I also have a few secondary works, including Companion to Narnia and others.
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Postby Tuke » 17 Aug 2008, 01:46

I have about half of your collection, Adam, plus The Personal Heresy, Present Concerns, Essays Presented to Charles Williams, and The Latin Letters Between Don Calabria, Don Pedrollo and CS Lewis (1947-61).
I have a few of his essays on Tolkien and Dorothy Sayers which I prize, but I can't remember where I copied them from.
I also have The Splendid Century (Louis XIV's France) by WH Lewis (dedicated "To My Brother" 1953); no luck yet finding The Sunset of the Splendid Century.
"The 'great golden chain of Concord' has united the whole of Edmund Spenser's world.... Nothing is repressed; nothing is insubordinate. To read him is to grow in mental health." The Allegory Of Love (Faerie Queene)

2 Corinthians IV.17 The Weight of Glory
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Postby Karen » 17 Aug 2008, 02:23

Tuke wrote:no luck yet finding The Sunset of the Splendid Century.


You can find 26 copies for sale here, at all kinds of prices.
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Postby Tuke » 17 Aug 2008, 02:52

Thanks. There are so many it makes me wonder why I had trouble finding it at my favorite used store.
"The 'great golden chain of Concord' has united the whole of Edmund Spenser's world.... Nothing is repressed; nothing is insubordinate. To read him is to grow in mental health." The Allegory Of Love (Faerie Queene)

2 Corinthians IV.17 The Weight of Glory
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Postby repectabiggle » 17 Aug 2008, 02:53

I've just uploaded a picture of my books by and about Lewis here: http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/3306/img2851fo5.jpg If you can't read them, just save the picture, open it in a viewer, flip it, and zoom a bit.

Volume II of the Collected Letters isn't shown because it's sitting elsewhere as I'm currently reading that.

I also have about fifteen or twenty extra copies of various of the standards, Mere Christianity, The Great Divorce, the Chronicles, etc. Good for lending out or giving away.

The only things I think I'm really missing at this point are Letters Vol. 3, various redundant essay collections, Selected Literary Essays, Arthurian Torso, Essays Presented to Charles Williams, and some other books of letters.

There are plenty of books about Lewis I'd like, of course.

I'll wager nobody else has the Narnia Solo Games books. :wink:

Changed my mind. Here's a list of the books by Lewis. You can look at the picture if you want to see what I've got about Lewis:

The Inspirational Works of C.S. Lewis (included Surprised by Joy, The Four Loves, and Reflections on the Psalms)
C.S. Lewis Essay Collection and Other Short Pieces (obviates most all of the little paperback essay collections out there)
Rehabilitations and Other Essays
The Latin Letters of C.S. Lewis
The Pilgrims Regress
Boxen (A collection of Lewis’s juvenilia)
The Allegory of Love
An Experiment in Criticism
Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Letters to Children
All My Road Before Me (Lewis’s diary)
A Preface to Paradise Lost
Till We Have Faces
The Four Loves
Narrative Poems
English Literature in the Sixteenth Century
Letters to Malcom
Poems (both editions)
George Macdonald
The Weight of Glory
The Abolition of Man
Spirits in Bondage
Studies in Words
Spenser’s Images of Life
Present Concerns
The Discarded Image
Out of the Silent Planet
Perelandra
That Hideous Strength
The Chronicles of Narnia
The Screwtape Letters
The Great Divorce
Mere Christianity
Miracles
The Problem of Pain
Letters to an American Lady
Timeless at Heart
The Personal Heresy
Collected Letters of C.S. Lewis Vols 1 & 2
Last edited by repectabiggle on 17 Aug 2008, 03:07, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby Adam Linton » 17 Aug 2008, 02:54

Karen wrote:
Tuke wrote:no luck yet finding The Sunset of the Splendid Century.


You can find 26 copies for sale here, at all kinds of prices.


All kinds of prices, indeed, starting very inexpensively.

I do have Warnie's Brothers and Friends, from his diaries.
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Postby Stanley Anderson » 17 Aug 2008, 16:33

We also have Taliessin Through Logres/The Region of the Summer Stars/Arthurian Torso, which is primarily Charles Williams' poetry, but the third part, Arthurian Torso is Lewis' commentary on the poems -- well worth the book even if one doesn't especially enjoy the first two sections of Williams' poetry. We also have On the Incarnation by St. Athanasius but with an introduction by Lewis.

--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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Postby repectabiggle » 17 Aug 2008, 16:46

Stanley, that introduction is reproduced in several places as "On the Reading of Old Books," right?
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Postby Adam Linton » 18 Aug 2008, 00:39

repectabiggle wrote:Stanley, that introduction is reproduced in several places as "On the Reading of Old Books," right?


I'm not Stanley, but that is, in fact, the case.

Also, round two of our library comparison (not ruling out those who still wish to get in on round one): Secondary Literature...

I'm not that big into the secondary literature on Lewis (ever hear the joke, "Wonderful thing the Bible; it sheds such light on the commentaries!"?). Sometimes, though it (secondary literature, that is) can be quite helpful. From my library, here's a selection of volumes--that I've found substantially helpful. (I'm not listing here my collection of what I consider notable articles.)

I've already mentioned Warnie's Brothers and Friends (which really counts as a primary source).

Michael Christensen, C. S. Lewis on Scripture
Paul Ford, Companion to Narnia
Roger Lancelyn Green & Walter Hooper, C. S. Lewis: A Biography
Walter Hooper, A Complete Guide to His Life and Works
Alan Jacobs, The Narnian
Justin Phillips, C. S. Lewis in a Time of War
George Sayer, Jack

And I should make additional mention of the volumes of personal recollections edited by Como and Poe, as well as Lindskoog's Journey into Narnia.

Also, Humphrey Carpenter's Inklings.

Otherwise...and I'm sorry if this sounds prideful, but unless we're really talking about top scholars--or people that knew him personally, I usually find that I know at least as much as most people who write books about Lewis. (But, then again, this is probably also true of a fair number of fellow Wardrobians.)

Anyone else have really notable/helpful titles to add to the Lewis selected secondary literature list?
Last edited by Adam Linton on 18 Aug 2008, 05:20, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Tuke » 18 Aug 2008, 01:13

Surprised By Laughter ~ Lindvall
Owen Barfield On CS Lewis
CS Lewis For The Third Millenium ~ Kreeft
The Spiritual Legacy of CS Lewis ~ Glaspey
And my favorite with 400 scrumptious pages, Reading The Classics With CS Lewis ~ Martin

I've heard Sayer's Jack is among the best.
What is Hooper's Complete Guide? What's the published date? Is it an update of his 1996 Companion & Guide wherein he inexplicably left out The Allegory of Love?
"The 'great golden chain of Concord' has united the whole of Edmund Spenser's world.... Nothing is repressed; nothing is insubordinate. To read him is to grow in mental health." The Allegory Of Love (Faerie Queene)

2 Corinthians IV.17 The Weight of Glory
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Postby Adam Linton » 18 Aug 2008, 01:37

Tuke wrote:I've heard Sayer's Jack is among the best.


I think that it is; the one I'd choose if I had to pick one. But I surely wouldn't want to do without Green/Hooper, either, esp. with the vivid, personal account of the last trip--to Greece.

Tuke wrote:What is Hooper's Complete Guide? What's the published date? Is it an update of his 1996 Companion & Guide wherein he inexplicably left out The Allegory of Love?


It is a substantial update, I believe--but as this volume in in my church office/study--I can't get the update year for you at the moment. Will check.
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Postby Stanley Anderson » 18 Aug 2008, 14:01

Adam Linton wrote:
repectabiggle wrote:Stanley, that introduction is reproduced in several places as "On the Reading of Old Books," right?


I'm not Stanley, but that is, in fact, the case.



As if anyone would trust that scoundrel Hooper to reproduce the thing accurately in another edition of "collected works". Hmph! Better to have the original where a preface is a preface and an introduction is really an introduction, and not just another essay among one more collection for fans to buy of mangled bits and a few likely-forged pieces, I say!

(in -- lighthearted enough, I hope -- mocking parody of the anti-Hooper contingent out there:-),
--Stanley
…on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a fair green country under a swift sunrise.
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