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Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

The man. The myth.

Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby teomiriam » 19 Feb 2009, 13:53

I checked and I don't think there is a similar topic, but I am sure every fan of C.S. Lewis has at least one favorite quote from his works. I have several, there are so many things from his books that amazed me when I read them, and come back to me so often. One of them is the quote on my signature about friendship:
"Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art, like the universe itself (for God did not need to create). It has no survival value; rather it is one of those things that give value to survival." - CS Lewis--The Four Loves

Another favorite quote is from "The Weight of Glory" and it amazes me every time I read it, Lewis really makes me see how great our God is:
"To please God...to be a real ingredient in the Divine happiness...to be loved by God, not merely pitied, but delighted in as an artist delights in his work or a father in a son--it seems impossible, a weight or burden of glory which our thoughts can hardly sustain. But so it is."

And one last favorite quote is from The Silver Chair:
"I daren't come and drink," said Jill.
"Then you will die of thirst," said the Lion.
"Oh dear!" said Jill, coming another step nearer. "I suppose I must go and look for another stream then."
"There is no other stream," said the Lion

There are actually more quotes I like, but I won't put them all here, because it would take up too much space :rolleyes:

What are some of your favorite quotes?
"Getting rid of dragons is not at all my line, but I'll do my best to think about it"" Bilbo Baggins
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby Michael » 19 Feb 2009, 14:56

"'Safe?' said Mr. Beaver...'Who said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe. but he's good. He's the King, I tell you.'"

--The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

And, of course, my siganture is also one of my favorites. But every time I read more of him I am amazed at his insights.
"A man can no more diminish God's glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word, 'darkness' on the walls of his cell."
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby mgton » 23 Feb 2009, 04:49

I always liked this funny line below about giving baths to centipedes. I love that Lewis snuck that funny line into such a serious thought.

"...man interferes with the dog and makes it more loveable than it was in mere nature. In its state of nature it has a smell, and habits, which frustrate man’s love: he washes it, house-trains it, teaches it not to steal, and is so enabled to love it completely. To the puppy the whole proceeding would seem, if it were a theologian, to cast grave doubts on the “goodness” of man: but the full-grown and full-trained dog, larger, healthier, and longer-lived than the wild dog, and admitted, as it were by Grace, to a whole world of affections, loyalties, interests and comforts entirely beyond its animal destiny, would have no such doubts. It will be noted that the man takes all these pains with the dog, and gives all these pains to the dog, only because it is an animal high in the scale - because it is so nearly loveable that it is worth his while to make it fully loveable. He does not house-train the earwig or give baths to centipedes. We may wish, indeed, that we were of so little account to God that He left us alone to follow our natural impulses - that He would give over trying to train us into something so unlike our natural selves: but once again, we are asking not for more Love, but for less."
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby Robert » 03 Mar 2009, 17:47

The fact that we have bodies is the oldest and most universal of all jokes


I have a portion of this quote tattooed on my arm.
[I am] Freudian Viennese by night, by day [I am] Marxian Muscovite

--Robert Frost--
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby plmbob » 07 Jun 2009, 08:38

My favorite quote is "When I have learned to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now." . Does anyone know the context or where it came from?
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby Sven » 07 Jun 2009, 18:44

Welcome, plmbob!

Lewis received a letter from a Mrs. W. Johnson, who asked him several questions. The tenth question she asked was "If Wayne didn't go to Heaven I wouldn't want to either. Would his name be erased from my brain?" Lewis replied on November 8th, 1952:

C. S. Lewis wrote:...
Whatever the answer is, I'm sure it is not that. When I have learnt to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now. In so far as I learn to love my earthly dearest at the expense of God and instead of God, I shall be moving towards the state in which I shall not love my earthly dearest at all. When first things are put first, second things are not suppressed but increased. If you and I ever come to love God perfectly, the answer to this tormenting question will then become clear, and will be far more beautiful than we cd. ever imagine. We can't have it now.
...

C. S. Lewis Collected Letters volume III
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby Bulgakov » 08 Jun 2009, 13:19

plmbob wrote:My favorite quote is "When I have learned to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now." . Does anyone know the context or where it came from?


Probably from his essay on "First and Second Things."
Jacob
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Re: Favorite Quote from C.S. Lewis

Postby Bulgakov » 08 Jun 2009, 13:21

My favorite one on solemnity. Shows the superiority of medievalism over the modern chaos.

‘solempne’. This means something different, but not quite different, from modern English solemn. Like solemn it implies the opposite of what is familiar, free and easy, or ordinary. But unlike solemn it does not suggest gloom, oppression or austerity. The ball in the first act of Romeo and Juliet was a solemnity...Feasts are, in this sense, more solemn than fasts. Easter is solempne, Good Friday is not. The Solempne is the festal which is also the stately and the ceremonial, the proper occasion for pomp--and the very fact that pompous is now used only in a bad sense measures the degree to which we have lost the old idea of solemnity. To recover it you must think of a court ball, or a coronation, or a victory march, as these things appear to people who enjoy them. ... Above all, you must be rid of the hideous idea, fruit of a wide-spread inferiority complex, that pomp, on the proper occasions, has any connexion with vanity or self-conceit. A celebrant approaching the altar, a princess led out by a king to dance a minuet, a major-domo preceding the boar’s head at a Christmas feast -- all these wear unusual clothes and move with calculated dignity. This does not mean they are vain, but that they are obedient; they are obeying the hoc age which presides over every solemnity. The modern habit of doing ceremonial things unceremoniously is no proof of humility; rather it proves the offender’s inability to forget himself in the rite, and his readiness to spoil for everyone else the proper pleasure of ritual.
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"Your revolver in your hand, a prayer on your lips, your mind fixed on Maleldil. Then, if he stands, conjure him.” “What shall I say in the Great Tongue?” “Say that you come in the name of God and all angels and in the power of the planets...." (That Hideous Strength)
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