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Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 26 Jun 2010, 11:20
by postodave
I would guess Lewis was thinking of or remembering that other work which both is and isn't a Christian allegory 'Coleridge's Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner'. And it's the word Albatross not the image that does the trick I think. Is it a good visual symbol? Would the sight of an albatross take most people into sea lore or Coleridge.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 26 Jun 2010, 11:49
by Larry W.
An albatross would be good enough for a sea voyage. I kind of wish that Lewis had included some other talking shore birds like plovers, sandpipers, or terns. For this story it would certainly have been appropriate. :smile: Sea gulls aren't the nicest birds, but I guess they were in Narnia. I'm a bird lover, but I prefer the less aggressive species (the beautiful piping plover is endangered here in Michigan). I guess that since Lewis was a great lover of Nature his world of Narnia would have wildlife such as birds and animals that are endangered in Britain.

Speaking of the sea, was there a lighthouse anywhere in Narnia? (I collect miniature lighthouses :smile: ). Maybe in the Cair Paravel castle there was some kind of light for sailors. I don't know how the Dawn Treader could have navigated without the aid of beacons. :smile:

Larry W.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 26 Jun 2010, 14:01
by postodave
The nice thing about talking birds is that they absolutely are not dressed up people. They have to have a different reality. I like the idea of a Narnian lighthouse with a keeper who would be a bit like the keeper of the fire in Bob Pegg's Ancient Maps. And since there is about one chance in a million you have ever heard of this I will post you the words if I can find them.
Here you go. I'd like to set this story in a Narnian lighthouse
The Keeper of the Fire
 
Once I was the king of all you see
Lords, dukes and ladies bowed down in front of me
My name was known and feared throughout the land
And I held the fate of many in my hand
 
I passed my days in fighting and in feast
I had no love for the poor man, no love for the priest
Many a soul was cindered on the pyre
For I ruled the people with a sword of fire
 
One morning I awoke and I was blind
I was robbed from before, I was cheated from behind
They drove me from the palace, scarred and lame
And a wanderer in the forest I became
 
So I went to live among the sticks and stones
A naked, eyeless beggar, with bruised and broken bones
I climbed the hills ‘til I could climb no higher
There I found the Keeper of the Fire
 
His mission was to keep a flame alight
That would guide the weary traveller through stormy day and night
He tended to my bruises and my wounds
And he told me that his time was coming soon
 
One day he didn’t answer to my call
I found his empty body as the rain began to fall
I groped to put a branch on the flame
And the Keeper of the Fire I became

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 27 Jun 2010, 02:09
by Larry W.
Thanks for the poem, postodave. The "keeper of the fire" would tend a Fresnel lens on Earth, although I don't know if they had those in Narnia. :smile:

Larry W.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 27 Jun 2010, 15:40
by postodave
I was thinking of something much more primitive, a bit like the Pharos lighthouse but much smaller. Anyway all this talk of the sea inspired me to dig out a book called 'A Book of Sea Legends' by Michael Brown. It's one of a series published in the sixties and seventies which My wife and I sort of collect, that is we pick them up if we find secodf hand copies. They are all called 'A book of . . . ' 'A Book of Dragons' edited by Roger Lancelyn Green has work by Lewis and Tolkien and is very good. This one on sea legends is another good one and has some useful information on albatrosses. It explains that it was commonly believed among seamen that if one of them drowned his spirit would pass into the body of a seagull and that this was the basis for Colerige's poem. However before Coleridge the idea that bit was bad luck to kill an albatross is not found. He adds that it would be surprising if there was such a belief given that the Albatross is such a rare bird only found in the southern ocean between 40 and 50 degrees south. He also describes some rather cruel treatment of albatrosses by late nineteenth century sailors. This is an introduction to a very funny poem called the albatross by R. P. Lister. I don't think I can get away with another poem though.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 27 Jun 2010, 15:51
by galion
Another albatross poem (not funny, however):

The Albatross
Sometimes for sport the men of loafing crews
Snare the great albatrosses of the deep,
The indolent companions of their cruise
As through the bitter vastitudes they sweep.

Scarce have they fished aboard these airy kings
When helpless on such unaccustomed floors,
They piteously droop their huge white wings
And trail them at their sides like drifting oars.

How comical, how ugly, and how meek
Appears this soarer of celestial snows!
One, with his pipe, teases the golden beak,
One, limping, mocks the cripple as he goes.

The Poet, like this monarch of the clouds,
Despising archers, rides the storm elate.
But, stranded on the earth to jeering crowds,
The great wings of the giant baulk his gait.
(Charles Baudelaire 1867 tr. Roy Campbell)

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 27 Jun 2010, 16:17
by Larry W.
In Michigan, the Great Lake state, we have over 100 beacons-- many are traditional lighthouses, and some are just crib lights or markers at the end of a pier. Some of them have the schoolhouse architecture, simple yet elegant. Maybe a Narnian lighthouse would look like this simple one at Old Mission Point:

Image

Or perhaps it would be a castle (resembling Cair Paravel) like Old Mackinac Point:

Image

Or how about this "storybook" lighthouse at Eagle Harbor?

Image

I always imagined Narnia to be a lot like northern Michigan. :smile:

Larry W.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 27 Jun 2010, 18:47
by Ticket2theMoon
The appearance of the White Witch disturbed me at first, but I didn't think of Dark Island. That would be just fine, totally fitting.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 28 Jun 2010, 21:09
by postodave
Those were fine lighthouses Larry. I think the third is the most Narnian. Galion, the poem by Baudelaire seems to be about the kind of cruelty to albatrosses Michael Brown described. Roy Campbell is a great translator I have his translation of the poems of John of the Cross. Didn't he have a verbal punch up with Lewis once - something to do with Spain?
Anyway since this Albatross poem is a rara avis on the net I will put it here:
The Albatross
I sailed below the Southern Cross
(so ran the seaman's song);
A pestilential albatross
Followed us all day long.

The creature's aspect was so grim,
And it oppressed me so,
I raised and on a sudden whim,
I lowered my crossbow.

The weather grew exceeding thick;
The sullen tempest roared.
A dozen of the crew fell sick,
The rest fell overboard.

The skies were so devoid of light
We could not see to pray.
The donkeyman went mad by night,
The second mate by day.

We set the live men swabbing decks,
The dead man manned the pumps.
The cabin steward changed his sex;
The captain had the mumps.

The cargo shifted in the hold,
The galley boiler burst.
My hair turned white my blood ran cold -
I knew we were accurst.

I helped the purser dig his grave
On the deserted poop;
I leaped into the foaming wave
And swam to Guadeloupe

And there (he said) I nibbled moss
Beside the stagnant lake . . .
I should have shot the albatross,
That was my big mistake.

P. P. Lister

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 29 Jun 2010, 00:48
by Larry W.
Thank for "The Albatross" poem. I always wondered what kind of birds those were that brought the fruit to take away a little each day from Ramandu's age. Maybe they were like cedar waxwings-- in fact, being social creatures, they will pass berries to each other while sitting on a telephone wire! :smile: Waxwings are found in Britain, and perhaps Lewis had them in mind. However, in the book they are just mentioned as large white birds that fly back and forth carrying fruit to Ramandu from the sun. Waxwings are usually olive green or yellow in color and are about the size of a sparrow.

Waxwings in Britain

Larry W.
'

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 01 Jul 2010, 05:53
by nomad
Oooh, thanks for posting. I wasn't looking for it yet. I don't mind the movies taking some artistic license... some is necessary because it's a different medium. Prince Caspian took that license waaaaay to far though, so I'm happy not to see anything in this trailer that seems way out of line. And, though the trailer isn't much to go on, it looks like there's more appreciation for beauty (referring to the look of the settings, not to Lucy's becoming-a-young-woman moment), and that is quite welcome. Very much looking forward to it.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 03 Jul 2010, 07:43
by glumPuddle
Here is my video analysis of the trailer...

PART 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcVkCiAg0no
PART 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFwkCL02OCU
PART 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35eEFAGQA6I

The movie could still be good, but this is just an awful trailer.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 03 Jul 2010, 22:44
by Stanley Anderson
Hi all,
Haven't posted here in months, and don't have much time now, but at a quick glance I noticed the mention of lighthouses and Narnia connections. Years ago, an old-time Wardrobian, Scott Baxter, who also mused about the idea of Narnian lighthouses, sent me a picture he got from a newspaper article (I think, though I may be mistaken there) that he said looked like how he imagined a Narnian lighthouse would look like. So I thought I would do a quick post of it here. Not sure where it is from.

Image

--Stanley

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 04 Jul 2010, 00:15
by Larry W.
Thanks for the picture, Stanley. That lighthouse looks like something that Tolkien could have used for Middle Earth, though it certainly could have been built in Narnia as well. It looks very medieval-- something from a time long before the Fresnel lens was invented. :smile:

Larry W.

Re: VDT Trailer

PostPosted: 04 Jul 2010, 04:09
by Matthew Whaley
That tower makes me think of "The Lady of Shalott." Thank you, Stanley. I love that poem.