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Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 27 May 2006, 12:30

Dear fgiusepp, what a coincidence!! What a beautiful picture!!! I almost can see my brother's family in the crowd behind - they were in Narni just three days ago, this Wednesday, May 24th! Ten out of fourteen; right now they are staying only half an hour south from you, at Nazzano, and are continuing to celebrate my brother's golden wedding anniversary. Had they known what to look for - they certainly would had been very happy to meet you!... :smile:

Long live the Blessed Lucy of Narnia!!!

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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Ticket2theMoon » 27 May 2006, 18:11

Is that the St. Lucy that a lot of cultures celebrate St. Lucia's Day for? I know in Sweden, in particular, the custom is quite widespread. I think it's cool.
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 30 May 2006, 09:12

Reep wrote:Dear fgiusepp, what a coincidence!! What a beautiful picture!!! I almost can see my brother's family in the crowd behind - they were in Narni just four days ago, this Tuesday, May 23rd! All fourteen of them; right now they are staying only half an hour south from you, at Nazzano and continuing to celebrate my brother's golden wedding anniversary. Had they known what to look for - they certainly would had been very happy to meet you!... :smile:

Long live the Blessed Lucy of Narnia!!!


now we have more informations about Blessed Lucy of Narnia at:

http://www.narnia.it/lucia_eu.htm
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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby carol » 30 May 2006, 10:48

I have just read the information for the first time. Thank you Fgiusepp!

I was amazed to read that Lucrezia Borgia had been recruiting nuns for Luci's convent! How did these two women from such different backgrounds and ways of life end up "in the same story"? Did Luci ever have any influence on Lucrezia's faith or way of life?
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 07 Jun 2006, 01:18

fgiusepp wrote:
now we have more informations about Blessed Lucy of Narnia at:
http://www.narnia.it/lucia_eu.htm
Beata Lucia da Narni

Remarks I found interesting in this report. "Lucy (Brocadelli) was placed on penance - she was never allowed to speak to anyone until her death 39 years later". Sounds worse than "Shawshank Redemption". And: "it is hard to understand how anyone not a saint could have so long endured such a life". I almost said yes then thought about Lucy Barfield. She did endure something similiar for 37 years. Another coincidence - they both lived to be 67 years old.

Did C.S. Lewis know about Lucy Brocadelli - since 1720 - the Blessed Lucy of Narni? As a Medieval and Renaissance scholar he certainly knew "all about Lucrezia Borgia". So it is not impossible that he also read about Lucrezia's relationship to Lucia Brocadelli (one of Lucrezia's own daughters was a nun). And especially so since Lucia came from a place which, in medieval Latin documents, probably still was called "Narnia". Latin language for C.S. Lewis was neither "dead" nor "obsolete" - for years he corresponded in Latin with an Italian priest (who was also declared blessed - by John Paul II in 1988!)

C.S. Lewis seemed really to enjoy his Latin Oxford address: "E Collegio Sanctae Mariae Magdalenae apud Oxonienses" - and the dates like: "Mart. xvii MCMLIII" (March 17, 1953). So a priest in Narni even today might write us "Ex Sacrario Beatae Luciae apud Narnienses"! (Am I correct, fgiusepp?!)
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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 07 Jun 2006, 15:47

Narnia is the official Latin name of Narni

What
is the official Latin name of Narni?"

Narnia is the official Latin name of Narni


. "What is the Latin name of the
Diocese of Narni?" If your bishop would write a Latin letter - would he say:
"Scriptum Narniae, in Aedibus Episcopalibus, die septimo Maii, A.D. MMVI"?

this is correct
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 16 Jun 2006, 00:12

bekados wrote:Hi there, fguisepp, haven't seen you here for a while. Did you ever read Prince of Foxes?

Thanks only to your posting of May 27th I found and watched the "Prince of Foxes" (1949) last night. An excellent movie : Orson Welles as Cesare Borgia, Tyrone Power, Everett Sloane. I would highly recommend it to almost anyone. Was stunned by its authentic and realistic presentation of the Renaissance - am sure C.S. Lewis would have enjoyed it. (Maybe he even did?)

This morning I ordered the book through the interlibrary loan. Blessed Lucia of Narni seems to have an important part in it: "... the duke and the cardinal [Duke Ercole de'Este and his son Cardinal Ippolito] send him [Andrea Orsini] to bring to Ferrara a living saint, a woman whose stigmata are the talk of the region... Orsini meets the saint, whose obvious piety deeply affects [him]." See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_of_Foxes
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 23 Jun 2006, 11:36

Reep wrote:Dear fgiusepp, what a coincidence!! What a beautiful picture!!! I almost can see my brother's family in the crowd behind - they were in Narni just four days ago, this Tuesday, May 23rd! All fourteen of them; right now they are staying only half an hour south from you, at Nazzano and continuing to celebrate my brother's golden wedding anniversary. Had they known what to look for - they certainly would had been very happy to meet you!... :smile:

Long live the Blessed Lucy of Narnia!!!


I have a contact with your brother's family, and we hope have more contact also for NARNIA.

now we have also a School exibition like you can see
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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 01 Jul 2006, 00:44

.
Concerning Narnia and Narni Roger Lancelyn Green writes about C.S. Lewis and Walter Hooper:

"When Walter Hooper asked [C.S. Lewis] where he found the word 'Narnia', Lewis shoved him Murray's Small Classical Atlas, ed.G.B. Grundy (1904), which he acquired when he was reading the classics with Mr Kirkpatrick at Great Bookham [1914-1917]. On plate 8 of the Atlas is a map of ancient Italy. Lewis had underscored the name of a little town called Narnia, simply because he liked the sound of it. Narnia - or 'Narni' in Italian - is in Umbria, halfway beween Rome and Assisi.

Narnia, a small medieval town, is situated at the top of an olive-covered hill. It was already ancient when the Romans defeated it in 299 BC. Its thirteenth-century fortress dominates a deep, narrow gorge of the Nera river which runs below. One of its most important archeological features is a Romanesque cathedral, which contains the relics of a number of Umbrian saints.

It is possible that Lewis named one of his central characters 'Lucy Pevensie' after his goddaughter - Lucy Barfield - to whom The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is dedicated... It is nevertheless a surprise to discover that the most popular of Narnia's saints is Blessed Lucy of Narnia, whose uncorrupted body lies in a side-chapel of the cathedral." See: Roger Lancelyn Green and Walter Hooper, C.S. Lewis: A Biography, 2002, p.306.
It is interesting that Roger Lancelyn Green prefers and suggests the original spelling Narnia (and not the Italian "Narni") for the modern English usage.

Is this the map (the plate 8) to which Walter Hooper refered? I came across it somewhere before I saw Roger Lancelyn Green's book:


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.
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 01 Jul 2006, 17:16

bekados wrote:Hi there, fguisepp, haven't seen you here for a while. Did you ever read Prince of Foxes?


Yes I did about Lucrezia Borgia and blessed Lucy, Narnia have also some connections with Farnese Giulia and Alessandro VI Borgia (Pope)

do you know this history ???????
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 01 Jul 2006, 17:28

Reep wrote:Concerning Narnia and Narni Roger Lancelyn Green writes about C.S. Lewis and Walter Hooper:

"When Walter Hooper asked [C.S. Lewis] where he found the word 'Narnia', Lewis shoved him Murray's Small Classical Atlas, ed.G.B. Grundy (1904), which he acquired when he was reading the classics with Mr Kirkpatrick at Great Bookham [1914-1917]. On plate 8 of the Atlas is a map of ancient Italy. Lewis had underscored the name of a little town called Narnia, simply because he liked the sound of it. Narnia - or 'Narni' in Italian - is in Umbria, halfway beween Rome and Assisi.

Narnia, a small medieval town, is situated at the top of an olive-covered hill. It was already ancient when the Romans defeated it in 299 BC. Its thirteenth-century fortress dominates a deep, narrow gorge of the Nera river which runs below. One of its most important archeological features is a Romanesque cathedral, which contains the relics of a number of Umbrian saints.

It is possible that Lewis named one of his central characters 'Lucy Pevensie' after his goddaughter - Lucy Barfield - to whom The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is dedicated, or he may simply have liked the sound and meaning of the name. It is nevertheless a surprise to discover that the most popular of Narnia's saints is Blessed Lucy of Narnia, whose uncorrupted body lies in a side-chapel of the cathedral."
See: Roger Lancelyn Green and Walter Hooper, C.S. Lewis: A Biography, 2002, p.306

It is interesting that Roger Lancelyn Green suggests the original Latin spelling Narnia (and not the Italian "Narni") for the common everyday English usage.

Is this the map (plate 8) to which he refers? I came across it somewhere before I saw this book:

Image


I write to Walter Hooper and I speak with Walter at Milan meeting 2005
before the last film . and Walter tell me that Lewis study on this map about Latin military campain and underscore also some road like Flaminia road like you can see in this map and the name Narnia .
I write this also in my book " Narnia and Narni" heos editor

http://www.narnia.it/libronarnia_eu.htm
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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 17 Jul 2006, 00:12

Roger Green wrote:Concerning Narnia and Narni Roger Lancelyn Green wrote:
"It is possible that Lewis named one of his central characters 'Lucy Pevensie' after his goddaughter Lucy Barfield... It is nevertheless a surprise to discover that the most popular of Narnia's saints is Blessed Lucy of Narnia, whose uncorrupted body lies in a side-chapel of the [Narnia's] cathedral."

And "The Martyrology of the Sacred Order of Friars Preachers" says: "The Sixteenth Day of November - At Ferrara in Italy, Blessed Lucy of Narni, virgin, of the Order of our Father St Dominic. Her incorrupted body is held in the greatest reverence at Ferrara."
http://www.op.org/domcentral/life/martyr11.htm#1115

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Re: re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby fgiusepp » 28 Jul 2006, 16:59

Ferrara is the place where dead Blessed Lucy , but now the body are at Narni town in the cathedral San Giovenale.




Reep wrote:
Roger Green wrote:Concerning Narnia and Narni
And "The Martyrology of the Sacred Order of Friars Preachers" says: "The Sixteenth Day of November - At Ferrara in Italy, Blessed Lucy of Narni, virgin, of the Order of our Father St Dominic. Her incorrupted body is held in the greatest reverence at Ferrara."
http://www.op.org/domcentral/life/martyr11.htm#1115

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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby King Edmund » 29 Jul 2006, 21:29

Interesting. Nice to see you guys.
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re: Happy feast of Blessed Lucy of Narni!

Postby Reep » 17 Aug 2006, 00:12

In an unforgettable scene from the book "Prince of Foxes" Sister Lucy Broccadelli of Narnia calmy faces the ruthless and powerful "Black Duke" Cesare Borgia (Duke of Valentinois and Romagna, Prince of Andria, Count of Dyois, Lord of Urbino... etc etc) with a message from God and a warning. "If you disobey, you will die tonight."

The author of the book, Samuel Shellabarger studied at Harward and Yale; taught at Princeton. Like C.S. Lewis, he also wrote scholarly works ("The Chevalier Bayard", "Lord Chesterfield"), but remains best known and loved for his adventure stories and for his historical fiction (for which he also earned more than $1.5 million).

He travelled extensively; served in World War I (his last son died in World War II). Lived in Switzerland, England and France. It seems very probable that (ten years younger) C.S. Lewis knew him - or at least had read some of his books. Including this story about the Sister Lucy (who became "The Blessed Lucy" only 210 years later).

See also http://www.samuelshellabarger.com/ and the eleven reviews of the "Prince of Foxes" at http://www.amazon.com
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