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What should the 'Caspian' characters look like?

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Postby Pete » 02 Jan 2007, 10:07

Messenger_of_Eden wrote:Wasn't it 100 years? I have always thought it was. :??:


It was never said in LW&W that it was 100 years, and I'm pretty sure (but not certain) that it wasn't said in any of the other books either, however, I seem to recall that it may have been the length of time Lewis gave to it in the timeline of Narnia that he wrote. :undecided:

Messenger_of_Eden wrote:But yes, The children riding talking Horses unnecessarily (not to mention the Unicorn) goes right against Narnian traditions. It is unthinkable, like eating a Talking Beast. Well maybe not THAT bad...


Hmm...well, I must give that some credit - it is written somewhere (I'm not going to hunt down the quote right now, but I believe it was in either or both H&HB and LB) that it is acceptable in important battles to ride talking animals and unicorns, so based on that, I think it would have been appropriate in the battle against the White Witch, but after that...:tsk:
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Postby ArdenZ » 02 Jan 2007, 20:17

Well, you do remember at the end of the movie, when they rediscover the lamp post, Edmund is riding the same talking horse.

The main thing I didn't like about the movie was the aspect of Aslan abiding in a tent, untouchable until being called out, which is the totally opposite of the book Aslan, who mingled and walked with all the creatures of Narnia. I think the movie made him seem a bit haughty and--I guess I'll use it again--untouchable. :undecided:
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Postby Messenger_of_Eden » 02 Jan 2007, 20:22

I think they did that for the goosebump effect--the thrill of seeing the Lion's paw stepping from the tent--especially if anyone is daft enough to never have known Aslan was a Lion.
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Postby Erekose » 02 Jan 2007, 20:27

My impression of the spirit of the stories was to the effect that it IS ok to ride a talking animal... WHEN that animal is willinging to bear the rider!

No conflict within the stories as far as I can tell.

You give a child a "piggy-back" ... oh horror!!! You are being used asabeastof burdan!! O Woe !!!. :undecided:

It's all in the context

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Postby Pete » 03 Jan 2007, 01:20

ArdenZ wrote:Well, you do remember at the end of the movie, when they rediscover the lamp post, Edmund is riding the same talking horse.


That's my point - see the previous page where I raised this issue. :wink:

ArdenZ wrote:The main thing I didn't like about the movie was the aspect of Aslan abiding in a tent, untouchable until being called out, which is the totally opposite of the book Aslan, who mingled and walked with all the creatures of Narnia. I think the movie made him seem a bit haughty and--I guess I'll use it again--untouchable. :undecided:


I'm not quite sure I can agree with you on this one - I thought it brought out the awe at seeing Aslan a bit more - which they needed to do considering they didn't build up the awe by describing Him much before they met Him like they do in the book... This is one of the strengths (in my view) of the BBC series. I mean, don't we all want to hear Peter say, as he says in the book and in the BBC series:

"I'm longing to meet him! Even if I do feel frightened when it comes to the point!"
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Postby ArdenZ » 04 Jan 2007, 19:51

Pete wrote:
ArdenZ wrote:Well, you do remember at the end of the movie, when they rediscover the lamp post, Edmund is riding the same talking horse.


That's my point - see the previous page where I raised this issue. :wink:


Yes, I was attempting to expound on that, but it came out the wrong way. My apologies. :tongue: :smile:
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Postby Ticket2theMoon » 09 Jan 2007, 19:06

I agree with Erekose, I think the spirit of the talking horse taboo is that it isn't appropriate to bridle a talking horse the way you would a common dumb horse. I don't remember about Phillip, but the unicorn Peter rode in the film didn't even wear a saddle. They don't go into all this in the movie, but I think the treatment of it is sufficiently consistent.

ETA: Incidentally, on the subject of casting Orlando Bloom as Prince Caspian, I actually thought of that (there are worse things) but then I thought, "Yeah, 'cause what he really needs to diversify his career is a big epic fantasy film. He hasn't done any of those."
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Postby carol » 10 Jan 2007, 09:22

LOL!!!

The concern about Aslan being in the tent - well, I think theatrically it was a good thing - he got to make an Entrance!! (technically an exit from the tent, but you know what I mean).
It went along with some of the deliberately theatrical moments in the Shrek films. Quite Adamsonish...

But in terms of the arrival of a major character, I think it was good that we have been hearing about him and now we will meet him - Here He Is!! Behold!
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Postby Pete » 10 Jan 2007, 09:35

carol wrote:But in terms of the arrival of a major character, I think it was good that we have been hearing about him and now we will meet him - Here He Is!! Behold!


But we don't hear about Him as much in the movie before meeting Him as we do either in the book or the BBC series - a weakness, in my opinion, of the movie...:sad:
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Postby Messenger_of_Eden » 10 Jan 2007, 17:49

Ticket2theMoon wrote:
ETA: Incidentally, on the subject of casting Orlando Bloom as Prince Caspian, I actually thought of that (there are worse things) but then I thought, "Yeah, 'cause what he really needs to diversify his career is a big epic fantasy film. He hasn't done any of those."


I think Orlando Bloom is too old for the Caspian role--I had always imagined him as mid-to late teens, very early 20's at the most, and then only on the Dawn Treader!

LOL I just could never get into him being Caspian--I would be thinking "Legolas' the whole time!!

I make fun of this phenomenon in my "Battle for Cindy" epic comic-style poster I created--you can click the link to see it if you like :toothy-grin: just use the zoom feature (view it as "large" or "original size" to see and read it clearly)
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Postby ArdenZ » 10 Jan 2007, 18:34

Wasn't Peter older than Caspian when the Pevensies were called back into Narnia, anyway? Or maybe I'm thinking incorrectly.
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Postby Ticket2theMoon » 10 Jan 2007, 21:14

Yeah, Orlie's too old. Incidentally, I've just found the reference to a hundred years of winter in the books. It comes from "Prince Caspian", oddly enough, in Chapter XII, "Sorcery and Sudden Vengeance":

"And anyway," Nikabrik continued, "what came of the Kings and their reign? They faded too. But it's very different with the Witch. They say she ruled for a hundred years: a hundred years of winter. There's power, if you like. There's something practical."


So there you go. I didn't remember that, but had decided to reread it, after all this Caspian-talk.
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Postby Messenger_of_Eden » 10 Jan 2007, 22:07

Yes, and King Tirian also mentioned the Hundred Years of Winter.
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Postby Pete » 11 Jan 2007, 05:57

Yeah, it struck me after I'd mentioned about the winter not being a hundred years that it may have been mentioned elsewhere. But personally (and here I am being the heretic) I think that's just Narnian history not being recorded as accurately as it could have been. After all...Mr Tumnus is able to describe Narnia prior to the 100 year winter pretty well for someone who would hardly be 100 years old! And not only that but (and here I suppose I have been partially influenced both by the movie but more by the BBC series) I have always had the impression that he was alive prior to the winter.

Now...as for Orlando Bloom and Prince Caspian...not only is he too old to play Caspian (at least the younger Caspian of PC), I have one obvious issue about him acting as Caspian in either PC or VDT - he's too well known!!! That'd never do! :rolleyes:
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Postby Leslie » 11 Jan 2007, 12:27

Pete wrote:After all...Mr Tumnus is able to describe Narnia prior to the 100 year winter pretty well for someone who would hardly be 100 years old!

But do we know the lifespan of a faun?
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