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Dear God .. who's responsible for THIS mess?

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Dear God .. who's responsible for THIS mess?

Postby jo » 24 Dec 2006, 12:57

I was flicking through the channels an hour or so ago and came across something that was obviously a cartoon version of LWW. ANyway I watched it - it's just finishing - and it really is the biggest load of trash I've ever seen - Lewis would have cried. Anyone know who made it, when and WHY? Have there been many cartoon versions?
"I saw it begin,” said the Lord Digory. “I did not think I would live to see it die"

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Postby Sven » 24 Dec 2006, 14:12

Was it this one?

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Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby jo » 24 Dec 2006, 15:45

Yeah *covers eyes*. All I could see from the end credits was that it was made in 79.
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Re: Dear God .. who's responsible for THIS mess?

Postby Stanley Anderson » 24 Dec 2006, 15:48

jo wrote:I was flicking through the channels an hour or so ago and came across something that was obviously a cartoon version of LWW. ANyway I watched it - it's just finishing - and it really is the biggest load of trash I've ever seen - Lewis would have cried. Anyone know who made it, when and WHY? Have there been many cartoon versions?


While I don't hold that cartoon version up as the ideal or anywhere near it, nevertheless, it always had far more emotional impact on me than the BBC "live" version. The animation is obviously very cartoon-ish throughout and oddly abstract at times, but there were portions that really moved me. Did you see it from the beginning, or only come into it in the middle. With those detractions of the lesser quality of animation, you would really need to see it from the beginning to fully appreciate the good parts that are there -- coming into the middle of it would only heighten the distraction of thinking how poorly animated it was, I think.

Now if you ever get to see the early "live" version that only got a little way into the book, you can see Tumnus with a costume that looks like he's wearing pajamas (not sure when it was made -- there are probably references to it on the internet out there. I only saw it once and can't remember much about it, but I would be curious to see it again)

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Postby Messenger_of_Eden » 24 Dec 2006, 16:16

I think I saw the cartoon on TV once when I was a kid. I tried to watch it but the Tumnus freaked me out. All I remember about the whole thing is this little red devil-faun. But maybe we should give it another chance in our old age :toothy-grin:
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Postby jo » 24 Dec 2006, 16:25

I saw it from when they'd just got into Narnia so no, I didn't see the beginning. But it was dire. The animation was dire and the voices was dire - the whole thing was just dire. I know there's no accounting for taste, Stan, but it seems weird to me that you could so comprehensively loathe the LOTR films but praise something like this ;).
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Postby Sven » 24 Dec 2006, 17:29

heh, That version won an Emmy for Outstanding Animated Program in 1979.
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby jo » 24 Dec 2006, 17:36

You are JOKING. What was the competition?
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Postby Sven » 24 Dec 2006, 18:04

...and the other nominees were:

You're the Greatest, Charlie Brown.
Happy Birthday, Charlie Brown.
She's A Good Skate, Charlie Brown.

Methinks good ol' Charlie Brown got a little overexposed that year...
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby Leslie » 24 Dec 2006, 18:07

Dig those groovy 70's outfits the Pevensies are wearing!
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Postby jo » 24 Dec 2006, 20:20

I would have voted for the CHarlie Brown movie, myself *rolls eyes*
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Postby Messenger_of_Eden » 24 Dec 2006, 20:20

Very culturally authentic. :wink:
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Postby Stanley Anderson » 25 Dec 2006, 00:00

jo wrote:I saw it from when they'd just got into Narnia so no, I didn't see the beginning. But it was dire. The animation was dire and the voices was dire - the whole thing was just dire. I know there's no accounting for taste, Stan, but it seems weird to me that you could so comprehensively loathe the LOTR films but praise something like this ;).


Well, "praise" might be perhaps a stronger word than I would be tempted to use for the animated LWW, but definitely not "loathe" as you probably accurately (with some degree of exaggeration) describe my feelings about the LotR movie.

And I think that pretty much puts to rest the accusation that I and others of my ilk are often subjected to -- the sort of accusation that says things like "oh Stan, you're just a stickler for details -- you want them to film it exactly like the book", when I've denied that sort of thing all along. It has more to do with capturing important things about a book in a movie -- and tons of action and penultagazillion dollar incredible special effects and detailed elvish engravings on the hilt of a sword that are never actually seen in the film, though possibly pleasant enough aspects if they are added on to other good things, are not in themselves terribly high on the list of what I think are important things to capture in a movie of a book.

For me, the BBC production was ok, but was sort of emotionally dead -- well that's an exaggeration -- it had moments, but I remember the animated version actually making me get choked up a bit in places, even though my intellectual mind was aghast at the type of animation I was watching. That told me that there was something good in there that could overcome the lack in other areas.

And that's part of why I have so many problems with the LotR movies. With the presumably pretty low budget (comparatively), the animated thing was still able to convey some of the impact of Aslan's death and resurrection, but with all those hundreds of millions of dollars for the LorR movies, they squandered it on stupid dwarf jokes and glittering swords and giant battle scenes and a million special effects and somehow missed the richness and beauty and agony and nobility that permeates the book. How could they miss all the important parts of the book? (for me, anyway -- I realize that many people whose opinion I respect loved the movies)

Well, there it is -- what can I say, but de gustibus... and all that I suppose (and again, the animated LWW was not my idea of an ideal rendition -- I just thought it succeeded better in some ways than the BBC version which doesn't put either one on very high pedestals, but neither does it utterly condemn either one)

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Postby Steve » 25 Dec 2006, 07:18

Leslie wrote:Dig those groovy 70's outfits the Pevensies are wearing!


I agree Peter and Edmund look 70s' with the bell bottoms.
But Lucy and Susan with their knee socks, is that 70s? Or earlier?
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Postby Pete » 25 Dec 2006, 09:14

I suppose this is rather unsurprising, but I disagree with Stan about the BBC LWW being emotionally dead...actually, to be honest, I find the '79 animation to be far more emotionally dead than the former. However, I would say that I'd very much agree with Stan's opinion if he said it in reference to PC - that was emotionally dead. :undecided:

Now, in reference to the early "live" version that Stan also referred to - I presume you're meaning the b&w version from around 1967 (if my memory of what I read on here long ago serves me correctly)?

Back to the original topic of this thread - the animation. There are some strengths about it, which I think I should point out and the most obvious (in my opinion) is its closeness to the book - okay so it is a bit American-ized and modernized (in so far as it has the American name of Maugrim, the characters - especially the children have American accents, and the costumes in the animation are clearly 1970s rather than 1940s), but to be honest it is closer to the book than the recent Adamson movie. Another thing I find odd about it though is...why did they take out Father Christmas? I know some people would argue that he is out of place in Narnia (not that I've seen any convincing reason for this argument), but I would say that this makes the animation a little disappointing - also, the fact that they see the White Witch (and vice versa) whilst they're on the run to the Stone Table is also something I don't like about the animation...but I have a similar issue regarding the Adamson movie (why do the Pevensies and the Beavers meet the wolves before they get to Aslan's Camp? I think that's one of the many flaws of the movie.

Okay, so I don't like too many changes from what the book says, so, I'll be honest and say that out of the 3 (Adamson's LWW, BBC's adaption and the animation) my favourite has to be the BBC's production! :coffe:
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