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Dear God .. who's responsible for THIS mess?

Please don't close the door behind you.

Postby Sven » 30 Apr 2007, 23:24

Welcome, Robert!

It's page 1111.


C. S. Lewis wrote:18 December 1959

Dear Sieveking
(Why do you 'Dr.' me? had we not dropped the honorifics?) As things worked out, I wasn't free to hear a single installment of our serial except the first. What I did hear, I approved. I shd. be glad for the series to be given abroad.

But I am absolutely opposed -adamant isn't in it!- to a TV. version. Anthropomorphic animals, when taken out of narrative into actual visibility, always turn into buffoonery or nightmare. At least, with photography. Cartoons (if only Disney did not combine so much vulgarity with his genius!) wd. be another matter. A human, pantomime, Aslan wd. be to me blasphemy. All the best.
Yours
C. S. Lewis

Collected Letters, volume 3
Rat! he found breath to whisper, shaking. Are you afraid?
Afraid? murmured the Rat, his eyes shining with unutterable love.
Afraid! Of Him? O, never, never! And yet -- and yet -- O, Mole, I am afraid!
Then the two animals, crouching to the earth, bowed their heads and did worship.
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Postby Robert Klemic » 01 May 2007, 03:17

Thank you greatly.
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Postby carol » 01 May 2007, 06:59

Larry W. wrote:I had liked the old-fashioned clothing used in the BBC version. It was even more accurate to the period than the wardrobe used in Andrew Adamson's movie


Larry, I'm surprised that you think the film didn't use authentic 1930s/40s clothing. I am impressed by the costumes, which I think were well in the period for English children.

Have you ever seen the costume site set up as an adjunct to Narniaweb? Here's a link Pevensies
I hope it will shed some light on the subject for you. Some of the movie companion material is also helpful.
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Postby Larry W. » 01 May 2007, 11:26

carol wrote:
Larry W. wrote:I had liked the old-fashioned clothing used in the BBC version. It was even more accurate to the period than the wardrobe used in Andrew Adamson's movie


Larry, I'm surprised that you think the film didn't use authentic 1930s/40s clothing. I am impressed by the costumes, which I think were well in the period for English children.

Have you ever seen the costume site set up as an adjunct to Narniaweb? Here's a link Pevensies
I hope it will shed some light on the subject for you. Some of the movie companion material is also helpful.


Adamson's wardrobe was certainly better than the appearance of the children in the 1979 cartoon .The way everything was done (e.g. hairstyles, clothing) in the animated movie looked like something from the 1970's to me. It was the way that the artists drew the people that seemed out of place to me. I wonder if they actually looked at pictures of children from the World War II era before they began animating the specials. It isn't that I don't like the fashions of the seventies, but they seemed a bit too modern for LWW. The animation, especially the characterizations of the people and the background settings, seemed more like the seventies than the time of World War II.

The wardrobe in the Andrew Adamson film was quite authentic, but in the BBC movies it was even better in being old fashioned. Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy looked more like the British school school children that you see in the news documentaries that were actually made during the war. When they became kings and queens, they looked more regal in the BBC version. (I especially liked the outfits and the crowns they wore). The crowning scene had more of medieval appearance and when they shown later as adults they looked more like kings and queens.

But I would have to agree that the actors are in Adamson's movie were more gifted in their roles. The best acting doesn't depend on clothing, although it can make appearance more convincing. Thanks for the link-- the information was helpful.

Larry W.
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Postby glumPuddle » 01 May 2007, 17:25

Yeah, I didn't care for the animated version. The only good thing about it I can remember was the music.

No Father Christmas?? And Aslan shouting his lions? American accents (in the version I saw)??

Makes me appreciate the most recent LWW movie, which isn't perfect, but it could've been a lot worse!
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Postby Larry W. » 02 May 2007, 00:45

As I remember, some of the artists that created the cartoon were the same as the ones who made the Peanuts specials for TV in the sixties. I had enjoyed those, but Charlie Brown is someone very different from Aslan. Peanuts is an American comic strip made for U. S. TV, but I think the BBC and Lewis' surviving family should have been directly involved in the making of the cartoon. Then it probably would have been more accurate to the book. Perhaps Pauline Baynes could have worked with the animators. Her illustrations brought to life would have made something that would have been a companion to the original book.

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Postby carol » 06 May 2007, 04:04

The animated version WAS set in the 70s, presumably for modern children to be able to identify with and understand them.
I saw it only once in 1980, and can't remember it well.
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Postby Larry W. » 07 May 2007, 01:42

It may have been the artists' intention to update the appearance of the cartoon to relate to children of that time, but much of the adherence to the original book was sacrificed. The old BBC specials were much more faithful to the original story in filming in actual locations in UK instead of drawing them blandly for us. I think a British artist who was at least familiar with Lewis' books and life would have done much better with the people and landscapes. It would have made the animated adventure seem more authentic if it was created by someone who who had a deeper understanding of the author and his work.

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