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Other Books of Enchantment

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Postby A#minor » 31 May 2007, 14:30

Dan65802 wrote:
A#minor wrote:Another pretty tale is Granny's Wonderful Chair by Frances Browne which is really a compilation of several shorter stories into one big story where the characters all finally meet in the end.


A#, thank you, thank you, thank you. This was a wonderful book. The introduction by Frances Hodgson Burnett by itself was enough to enchant me. I'm sending a copy to a friend of mine who's been asking about morality driven children's books. He's a movie producer and he's looking for material. So, you never know...

- Dan -

You're welcome! I'm so glad you liked it! Isn't it a lovely book?! I still re-read it every once in awhile. So we might be seeing a movie one of these days?! Wow.
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Postby Dooby » 02 Jun 2007, 02:34

A#minor wrote:And I'll add to the list what are commonly known as the 'Shoe' books by Noel Streatfeild. Ballet Shoes is my favorite, but Dancing Shoes, Theater Shoes and Skating Shoes are also quite good.


These are lovely, but I much prefer them by their original titles and not the silly "shoes" ones.

Ballet Shoes is one of my favourites. The books that can be considered sequels of sorts to it are Curtain Up (Theatre Shoes), The Painted Garden (Movie Shoes - I mean, Movie Shoes????), and Apple Bough (Travelling Shoes). I also love Wintle's Wonders (Dancing Shoes), White Boots (Skating Shoes), and The Circus is Coming (Circus Shoes).
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Postby A#minor » 02 Jun 2007, 15:53

I never knew that they were first published under different names! :stunned:
You're right. I like the other titles much better.
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Postby Dooby » 03 Jun 2007, 07:23

The "Shoes" titles are the American versions, I think.

If you like Ballet Shoes and Curtain Up (Theatre Shoes is abridged) and you haven't read The Painted Garden, then you should definitely get hold of a copy if you can :smile: . It has a lot of links with Ballet Shoes ... one of the girls in it is a student at Madame Fidolia's school, and she meets the adult Posy and Pauline Fossil in California. The book is about the making of a film of The Secret Garden, which is quite interesting. I think she based it on the filming of the 1949 film version.
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Postby carol » 03 Jun 2007, 10:58

I re-read Painted Garden about 12 years ago, and loved it again. I'd like to get a copy. I'm gradually collecting the Streatfeilds I like.
Sadly it's hard to get them unabridged; I've got a secondhand copy "Curtain Up" the second of the Madame Fidolia school ones, but when I read it I found some of my favourite bits missed out. Darnit!
It happened at a time when some silly publisher thought children couldn't read books longer than about 200 pages any more - suddenly in the late 90s Rowling and her publicity machine proved them wrong!
I've got Tennis Shoes, and would love to get White Boots.
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Postby Dooby » 03 Jun 2007, 11:19

I've been tending to buy old first editions of the Streatfeilds over the internet, as they're not too expensive and then I can be sure that they're not abridged. I have a hardback and a paperback of Curtain Up, and the paperback is abridged. I believe the paperback of The Painted Garden was abridged to take out the war references.

Though I have a later hardback of Ballet Shoes which is abridged, and an earlier paperback that isn't! :lol:

The Circus is Coming is really good, it paints a much more realistic picture of a touring circus than say, the Enid Blyton circus books (which are still entertaining though).
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Postby A#minor » 03 Jun 2007, 19:21

How can you tell if they are abridged? Why would they abridge those books anyway?! They can't be that long in the original! Now I'm scared that my "Shoe" books are probably abridged, mutilated, deformed, distorted, warped, falsified, and generally disfigured. :stunned: :read: :sad:

I have the BullsEye Book editions of Dancing, Theater, and Ballet Shoes published by Random House in 1994. Does that make them abridged?

I spit upon all editors and abridgers. :angry: Editing is a nasty filthy habit.
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Postby Dale Nelson » 04 Jun 2007, 03:27

Take a look at The Little Grey Men, written and beautifully illustrated by Denys Watkins-Pitchford (who sometimes wrote as "BB"). The book is about gnomes - - Cloudberry, Sneezewort, Baldmoney - - who live in a lovingly-rendered English countryside.

Let me also recommend that folks get to know the art of the 19th-century artist Samuel Palmer, especially in his early "Shoreham" period and in his late etchings after Virgil and Milton. I recommend Geoffrey Grigson's Samuel Palmer: The Visionary Years for text, although more recent books have better reproductions of the art.
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Postby carol » 04 Jun 2007, 20:37

A#minor wrote:How can you tell if they are abridged? Why would they abridge those books anyway?! They can't be that long in the original!
I spit upon all editors and abridgers. :angry: Editing is a nasty filthy habit.


Look in the small print in the front.... somewhere it may say it.

I knew my "Curtain Up" was abridged when I realised it was missing the wonderful bit where at her Christmas Day party, Granny does a spoof version of her son-in-law's famous version of the "All the world's a stage" speech from As You Like It - in it, he peels an apple as he talks. SHE peels a pumpkin!!!!

It's evidently thought to be over the heads of the child readers, but I think it needs to be re-published in full, now that kids can read long books again. (hehe)
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Postby A#minor » 05 Jun 2007, 14:33

carol wrote:Look in the small print in the front.... somewhere it may say it.

That's the first place I looked. I looked all over and it doesn't say anything about an editor or being abridged. Of course that doesn't mean it isn't abridged; it just means they choose not to tell you.
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Postby Guest » 05 Jun 2007, 15:20

A#minor wrote:That's the first place I looked. I looked all over and it doesn't say anything about an editor or being abridged.


Well, there's almost always an editor. Authors are rarely good grammarians.
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